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“Frites by Idaho” is a new perfume that smells like french fries

The Idaho Potato Commission has issued a new perfume that they claim smells like french fries. Frites by Idaho, they claim delivers “one of the world’s most irresistible scents.”

 “Whether you’re at a drive through restaurant or dining in, it’s near impossible to not grab a fry and take a bite before you dive into your meal,” IPC president/CEO Jamey Higham said in a statement. — Read the rest


Source: “Frites by Idaho” is a new perfume that smells like french fries

Vaccination rates soar after Quebec requires the shot to buy alcohol or weed

To boost low vaccination rates Quebec has successfully required proof of vaccination to enter weed or alcohol stores.

CTV News:

In a brief message posted to social media Friday morning, Dubé notes that in the last few days, appointments for first doses have increased from 1,500 per day to more than 6,000.

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Source: Vaccination rates soar after Quebec requires the shot to buy alcohol or weed

Fisher Price adds bluetooth to classic Chatter Telephone toy

A fine example of the “now you have two problems” joke is “I know, let’s add bluetooth!” Fisher Price added bluetooth to the Chatter Telephone.

Its intuitive bulky face design comes with a ‘super-advanced’ rotary dial and connects to your mobile device via Bluetooth® wireless technology, so you can make and receive real calls through your existing phone plan.

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Source: Fisher Price adds bluetooth to classic Chatter Telephone toy

Oreos cunningly packaged as unappetizing brands to deter children and amuse adults

New packaging for Oreos cookies disguises the delicious junk food as healthy veggies and other unappetizing things such as Hanes t-shirts, Ford automobile manuals and 1970s cookbooks.

“The brand is calling the limited edition packaging a ‘protection program’ against thieving children,” writes Kathryn Lundstrom for Ad Age.Read the rest


Source: Oreos cunningly packaged as unappetizing brands to deter children and amuse adults

FedEx Shipping Damage Creates Fractured Artworks

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Walead Beshty's FedEx artworks

Walead Beshty's FedEx artworks

Walead Beshty's FedEx artworks

Walead Beshty's FedEx artworks

Since 2007, artist Walead Beshty has been cleverly using FedEx’s shipping infrastructure to create a series of artworks. He constructs glass objects that fit exactly into FedEx’s shipping boxes and then ships them to galleries and museums without any protection against damage. Any cracks or breaks in the glass became part of the work upon display at its destination. According this interview, part of what interested Beshty about doing this project related to the proprietary sizes of FedEx’s boxes:

As for the corporate dimension, I was aware that standard FedEx boxes are SSCC coded (serial shipping container code), a code that is held by FedEx and excludes other shippers from registering a box with the same dimensions. In other words, the size of an official FedEx box, not just its design, is proprietary; it is a volume of space which is a property exclusive to FedEx. When thinking about the work, its scale and so on, it made sense to adhere to that proprietary volume, because, as a modular, it had a real and preexisting significance in daily life, it was common, specific, and immediately familiar. That is, it had an iconic resonance that a more arbitrary form or shape wouldn’t have.

And each time the work is shipped — say from one gallery to another — it’s unwittingly altered further by a system created by a massive multinational corporation:

Rather than thinking in terms of the Duchampian readymade, which is most often understood as operating iconically — as in the appropriation and repositioning of a static thing — I was thinking of readymade systems of production, of using pre-existing active systems to produce a work. No object is truly static anyway, so this opened up broader questions I had about the tradition of appropriation, the way it froze cultural signifiers and reapplied them to other contexts, treated images as dead, static things… The object isn’t treated differently than other FedEx packages, I simply used FedEx to transport an object that registers how the system treated it in aesthetic terms. The result is that the object is constantly changing. Every time the work is shipped it goes through a material transformation.

Tags: art   FedEx   Walead Beshty


Source: FedEx Shipping Damage Creates Fractured Artworks