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Hoi Toider, an American Dialect that Doesn’t Sound American

Hoi Toider is a dialect spoken by long-time residents of Ocracoke, North Carolina. It sometimes sounds more Australian, Scottish, or like Elizabethan English than American English.

When older Ocracoke natives, or O’cockers as they call themselves, speak, the ‘I’ sound is an ‘oi’, so they say ‘hoi’ instead of ‘high’. That’s where the Hoi Toider name comes from: it’s based on how the O’cockers say ‘high tide’.

Then there are the phrases and vocabulary, many of which are also kept over from the original settlers. For example, when you’re on Ocracoke, someone might ‘mommuck a buck before going up the beach’, which means ‘to tease a friend before going off the island’.

“We have a lot of words that have been morphed to make our own,” said Amy Howard, another of William Howard’s descendants, who runs the Village Craftsmen, a local arts and crafts store. “[Hoi Toider] is a combination from a whole blend of cultures. A lot of the early settlers were well travelled, so they ran into lots of different types of people. For example, the word ‘pizer’ we use comes from the Italian word ‘piazza’, which means porch. So if you’re going to be sitting on your pizer, you’re sitting on your porch.”

You can hear some folks speaking Hoi Toider is these videos:

Tags: language   video


Source: Hoi Toider, an American Dialect that Doesn’t Sound American

This machine learning-assisted cat door keeps kitty from bringing furry surprises home

Using an Arduino, a bunch of code and a little machine learning, Benn Hamm created a cat door to keep his cat from bringing dead–and sometimes live–rats and birds into his home in the middle of the night. It’s not often that I’m down with bringing surveillance technology into homes but, as a former cat owner who’s had to clean bird shit off a flat-screen TV, I have nothing but love for this project.

Image via Wikipedia Commons


Source: This machine learning-assisted cat door keeps kitty from bringing furry surprises home

That’s Dr. Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck to you!

After eight years, Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck has earned her PhD in higher education from Cardinal Stritch University. And yes, Marijuana Pepsi is her real given name. From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

Her mother, Maggie (Brandy) Johnson, who still lives in Beloit, (Wisconsin) picked out her name and proclaimed that it would take her around the world. Her sisters, one older and one younger, got relatively common names, Kimberly and Robin.

Teachers, classmates, bosses and other people in Marijuana’s life pushed back against her name and teased her. Some suggested she go to court and change it. Some flat out refused to call her that or insisted on Mary, which she rejected.

As much as people blamed and judged her mother for the name, Marijuana credits her mom with making her the strong, balanced, entrepreneurial woman she is today…

But mostly she embraces the name as proof that you can overcome any obstacle in life and achieve your dreams…

It’s fitting that an African American woman who has gone through life as Marijuana Pepsi chose as her dissertation topic: “Black names in white classrooms: Teacher behaviors and student perceptions.”

Yes, her name really is Marijuana Pepsi, and now she’s Dr. Marijuana Pepsi to you” by Jim Stingl (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)


Source: That’s Dr. Marijuana Pepsi Vandyck to you!

Chain Your Kid’s Hairbrush to the Bathroom Wall

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If you’re curious about the morning routine of this parenting editor, I will tell you that a large portion of it involves scampering around the house, asking: “Has anyone seen a hairbrush?” (I say “a” hairbrush because we have about six of them lying around somewhere.) This has been a dumb, ongoing issue. I never have…

Read more…


Source: Chain Your Kid’s Hairbrush to the Bathroom Wall

Listen to an author realize her forthcoming book contains a terrible mistake

Author Naomi Wolf has a new book coming out titled “Outrages: Sex, Censorship and the Criminalization of Love“. It’s about the emergence of homosexuality as a concept and its criminalization in 19th-century England.

…the story, brilliantly told, of why this two-pronged State repression took hold—first in England and spreading quickly to America—and why it was attached so dramatically, for the first time, to homosexual men.

Before 1857 it wasn’t “homosexuality” that was a crime, but simply the act of sodomy. But in a single stroke, not only was love between men illegal, but anything referring to this love became obscene, unprintable, unspeakable.

In a BBC interview with Wolf, her host, historian Matthew Sweet, points out two serious problems with her work. First, she assumes “sodomy” refers to homosexuality, but a key example she uses was a child abuser.

Secondly, she assumes the 19th-century legal term “death recorded” (for example) means the convict was executed, when in fact it means the opposite: the sentence of death being merely recorded rather than carried out, because the prisoner was pardoned and freed. A term she thought signaled draconian punishment turns out to demonstrate leniency.

Oops!

Here’s the tape. Sweet is polite and professional, and Wolf takes the news well, but it’s very painful listening.

Everyone listen to Naomi Wolf realize on live radio that the historical thesis of the book she’s there to promote is based on her misunderstanding a legal term pic.twitter.com/a3tB77g3c1

— Edmund Hochreiter (@thymetikon) May 23, 2019

Fortunate that it isn’t out yet (and perhaps not even printed, as the release date is a couple of months out) so Wolf and publisher Virago can fix it. But Sweet adds that the supposed execution of gay men in Victorian England is a “major plank” in the book, when in fact the last one took place years before her reign.


Source: Listen to an author realize her forthcoming book contains a terrible mistake